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Programme de bourses "Jeunes Chercheurs"

Apartheid South Africa's Foreign Relations with African States, 1961-1994

Abstract
This thesis examines South Africa’s foreign relations, viewed from a South African perspective, with the black African countries beyond southern Africa from 1961 to 1994. These relations were determined by the conflict between Pretoria’s apartheid ideology on the one hand, and African continental rejection of South Africa’s race discrimination policies and its exclusion from the community of African states on the other.
The documentary material used primarily stems from the Department of Foreign Affairs archive in Pretoria, supplemented by research conducted in other archives. Furthermore, we conducted interviews and correspondence, and consulted the relevant primary and secondary literature. Given the main source of information, we chose to make this work a case study in Diplomatic History. In consequence, and constituting the core of the study, Chapters 3 to 6 explore the interaction between South Africa and the black African states in a chronological order. At the same time, we draw on the analytical concepts from the academic disciplines of Political Science and its derivative, International Relations, to comprehend developments more fully.We discuss the significance of the approaches from these two disciplines in both the Introduction and Chapter 2. In particular, we emphasise that this study is about Pretoria’s foreign policy, involving state and non-state actors, and we suggest that the unequal status between South Africa and the other African states constitutes an inherent factor in the relationshi
p between them.
The Conclusion examines the role of the state and non-state actors indetermining Pretoria’s foreign relations and the relevance of the structural imbalance between South Africa and the black African states in this context.


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PhD by Roger PFISTER
Department of Political Studies, Rhodes University, ZA-Grahamstown 6140, South Africa
E-Mail: ropfiste@hotmail.com